horror

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Humans Hunting Humans Horror

Humans love to stalk, to hunt, to devour. Many of the advancements humanity has found in the world have their roots in the desire to overpower another: weaponry, medicine, knowledge, these are all achievements which place humanity at the top of a quickly narrowing pyramid of superiority. We want nothing more than to know that we are at the top of the food chain.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Nazi Horror

Sometimes, it’s nice to have a bad guy that everyone can hate. In horror, you often want people to root for one person or group and against another, and it becomes troublesome to create three-dimensional villains that have real-life motivations and reasons for the awful things they do. When faced with a situation like that, one of the tried and true solutions is to bring in the Nazis.

Aftershock (REVIEW)

When I watched “Aftershock” by Nicolas Lopez I knew immediately after watching it how I felt. Much like the recent “Evil Dead” remake I went back and forth during the movie but once I left the theater it hit me like a residual aftershock: that was dumb. Pardon my lame and immature word, but it’s the first thought that came to my mind. In big boy words, “Aftershock” suffered from a genre identity crisis and ultimately created a pointless story full of empty character development.

"They Live" & "Halloween" Anniversary Screening with John Carpenter Q+A recap

Event number two for John Carpenter this month! If you haven't yet, check out my last post about the anniversary screening for John Carpenter's "The Thing". He did a round of Q&A then too and surprisingly the questions asked this time were all different than from before.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: SURGICAL/MEDICAL HORROR

Though the study and practice of medicine has been around since the beginnings of human civilization, it is only within the past 150 years that the medical field has made its most groundbreaking and world-changing discoveries and advancements. We’ve learned what germs are, what they do, and how to destroy them; we’ve discovered DNA sequencing and the secrets of genetic coding; and we’ve advanced the act of surgery, once a desperate battlefield choice likely to kill the patient, to an outpatient procedure that people can volunteer for when they don’t like the shape of their noses.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Theatrical Performance Horror

In a theatrical performance, there is an obvious deception that is accepted by both the audience and the performers. On a stage seventy-five feet wide with a fake sunset painted on a backdrop and plywood castle walls dressed in colored construction paper, the audience must be willing to buy into the blatant fantasy that is Hamlet’s Denmark. The performers accept it as well, altering their natural voice and body to the over-enunciation, volume, and broad gestures necessary for the performance to reach the back of the theater.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Western Horror

Isolation and loneliness are often at the heart of any situation that instills irrational fear in humanity, and nothing is more isolated and lonely than the untamed American West. With hundreds of lawless miles in-between outposts of civilization, a single human being is at constant threat from rough terrain, weather, and both animal and human predators. When he finds himself dehydrated, starving, lost, or injured, he becomes imprisoned by that distance; it is claustrophobia in the world’s biggest locked room.

Kiss of the Damned (REVIEW)

It should be noted that “Kiss of the Damned”, written and directed by Xan Cassavetes, is her first theatrical release. When I thought about the state of vampire films today, the way they glamorize and glorify the concept, I was expecting this film to follow suit. To my surprise, it took me back to the gothic horror that used to dominate the fictional world of the blood thirsty. What makes this film stand out is the beautifully calculated cinematography that maintains the classic gothic tone in a modern setting.

Book Review: Ad Nauseam by C.W. LaSart

CW LaSart’s horror collection is very accurately named, Ad Nauseam, as it harbors thirteen tales of intensely stomach churning horror. LaSart is a pro at spinning a driving story with characters who often live on the fringe of society’s idea of convention and do not warrant much pity for their decisions in the direction of their lives. However unconventional LaSart’s characters may be, the terror that awaits them in her stories are nothing less than gut wrenching.

Book Review: These Lonely Places by RK Kombrinck

Solid anthologies are usually hard to come by. All too often collections are littered with great, enrapturing stories as well as the few you’d really rather skip through. However, this is definitely not the case with RK Kombrinck’s These Lonely Places, which is a complete ensemble of unnerving stories that dredge up the unconscious fear in everyday life.

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