horror

CW LaSart’s horror collection is very accurately named, Ad Nauseam, as it harbors thirteen tales of intensely stomach churning horror. LaSart is a pro at spinning a driving story with characters who often live on the fringe of society’s idea of convention and do not warrant much pity for their decisions in the direction of their lives. However unconventional LaSart’s characters may be, the terror that awaits them in her stories are nothing less than gut wrenching.

Solid anthologies are usually hard to come by. All too often collections are littered with great, enrapturing stories as well as the few you’d really rather skip through. However, this is definitely not the case with RK Kombrinck’s These Lonely Places, which is a complete ensemble of unnerving stories that dredge up the unconscious fear in everyday life.

Left on the roadside by their wayward and absconding mother, Delphine Dodd realizes this time is not like the others. She and her little sister, Olive, have been discarded on the side of the road like trash, only to find themselves floating aimlessly into the care of their unfamiliar grandmother. Set in the early settlement years before the First World War, S.P Miskowski weaves Delphine’s vivid recollections of her adolescence into a haunting dreamscape.

Dan Dillard’s short story Pig Man is the prime example of that tin platitude, a little bit goes a long way. Clocking in at only eleven pages, Pig Man, successfully delivers the chilling creeps that loiter well past the fifteen or so minutes it takes to read it the story.

**Important note: NO, this book has nothing to do with the infamous weirdo and horse video by the same name. Just in-case any of you get confused or decide to google "Mr. Hands." I'd definitely add "book" to those search terms - or don't, if you're into that kind of thing. **

Ana and Ben Kransen are young newlywed parents trying to make ends meet in the early 1930's. Due to the stressful economic times, they decide moving from Ana's parents' conservative home in south Florida, to the more established family home of Ben's in northern Florida is the best idea. The Kransen family owns a business and Ben soon goes to work for his father to save money to finally begin a life with Ana and their baby, Angela, of their own.

Most little girls love dolls and will do anything to have the one they want. Joyce Parker’s daughter, Taylor, is no different. On a mother-daughter getaway to Mexico, the girls decide to visit an unusual tourist attraction: The Island of the Dolls. On the island, there are hundreds of dolls hanging from the trees and placed on altars in various stages of decomposition and disarray. Warned not to disturb anything on the island, Joyce is already unnerved enough by the atmosphere and carefully watches Taylor as she admires the eerily beautiful dolls; but close enough.

Deserted, rural, back mountain roads are unsettling in their own right, but add a blinding snow storm and four unnerved vacationers – it’s a recipe for disaster. Vincent Hobbes' short story THEY, is the embodiment of any traveler’s worst nightmare.

The Perfume of the Lady in Black (Il Profumo Della Signora in Nero)

A quick Google will tell you that "The Perfume of the Lady in Black" has had a kind of renaissance on some Horror blogs this year, due to the Raro Video DVD release and availability on Netflix Instant. The praise is well deserved. The movie's sumptuous visuals, subtly masterful direction, and hallucinatory, poetic journey are well worth your time.

There's so much to make fun of with Christine O'Donnell's "I'm not a witch" Campaign, but when Elvira spoofs you, it's pretty much a guarantee you've just suffered some Ownage.

Don't worry! Our enamored Lady of Darkness hasn't lowered herself to political statements or ads - she's simply here to attack the atrocious state of late night TV, & encourage you to watch her return to the air with Elvira's Movie Macabre!