horror

Horror By the Sub-Genres: VOODOO ZOMBIE HORROR

It’s hard to argue that there could be an iconic horror figure that is currently more popular than the zombie. From film to television to comics, the living dead have done to popular culture what they do to human flesh: they have devoured en masse and made converts of us all. The ultimate irony, of course, is that the creatures that populate these movies and shows that we love so much aren’t actually zombies at all.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Body Snatching Horror

The death of the body is supposed to be the last journey that the physical form goes on in a lifespan. Regardless of one’s spiritual beliefs, all religions tend to agree with the central tenet that the human body is a physical one, meant for eventual decay, and that we will all end up traveling back into the life cycle of the Earth, decomposed and returned to the soil, broken down to the key components that made us alive in the first place.

Horror BY the Sub-Genres: Pregnancy Horror

Giving birth is the weapon humanity has against the constant attempt of nature to destroy it, the yin to death’s yang. It is the way that people gain a measure of immortality in the physical world, a way to make sure that half of the genetic information that makes up who you are continues on after you’re long gone. It’s also an amazing way to bring together humanity, literally combining two separate human beings at a genetic level, knitting them together more closely than any relationship ever could.

Twixt (REVIEW)

“Twixt” surprised me more than I could have expected. I went into this film blindly, and by the end I chocked it all up to a valiant effort from a first time director. There were some intriguing concepts strewn here and there but overall it felt like an introductory mess. Needless to say when I saw the director and writer of the film I was floored. Francis Ford Coppola, director of iconic films such as “The Godfather” trilogy and “Apocalypse Now”, had taken a stab at the horror genre. The whole feeling of the film changed with that knowledge.

Book Review: Geddy's Moon by John Mulhall

Geddy’s Moon is John Mulhall’s debut novel, which he began working on over twenty years ago as a teenager. This tidbit of knowledge is extremely important, as all his efforts and years poured into this project definitely paid off tenfold.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Dream Horror

There is an inevitability to sleep that makes it frightening in a way that most real-world fears can never quite match. Sharks can be scary, but you can always stay out of the water, and you’re never required to go camping or participate in a séance with your friends. But sleep… that’s an inevitability to which everyone eventually succumbs.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Humans Hunting Humans Horror

Humans love to stalk, to hunt, to devour. Many of the advancements humanity has found in the world have their roots in the desire to overpower another: weaponry, medicine, knowledge, these are all achievements which place humanity at the top of a quickly narrowing pyramid of superiority. We want nothing more than to know that we are at the top of the food chain.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: Nazi Horror

Sometimes, it’s nice to have a bad guy that everyone can hate. In horror, you often want people to root for one person or group and against another, and it becomes troublesome to create three-dimensional villains that have real-life motivations and reasons for the awful things they do. When faced with a situation like that, one of the tried and true solutions is to bring in the Nazis.

Aftershock (REVIEW)

When I watched “Aftershock” by Nicolas Lopez I knew immediately after watching it how I felt. Much like the recent “Evil Dead” remake I went back and forth during the movie but once I left the theater it hit me like a residual aftershock: that was dumb. Pardon my lame and immature word, but it’s the first thought that came to my mind. In big boy words, “Aftershock” suffered from a genre identity crisis and ultimately created a pointless story full of empty character development.

"They Live" & "Halloween" Anniversary Screening with John Carpenter Q+A recap

Event number two for John Carpenter this month! If you haven't yet, check out my last post about the anniversary screening for John Carpenter's "The Thing". He did a round of Q&A then too and surprisingly the questions asked this time were all different than from before.

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