guillermo del toro

From Cronos to Hellboy and Crimson Peak, writer/director Guillermo del Toro has consistently demonstrated his transformative brand of storytelling. His gothic imagery oozes deep shadows from the frame, capturing his characters and audiences in a world that although displaced from reality, feels at their greatest moments intimate, familiar, and warm. The 2006 horror/dark fantasy Pan’s Labyrinth is for many del Toro's finest hour, blending magical realism with the most balanced touch of upending humanity’s favorite conflict: good vs. evil.

A film about lovers.  Pale lovers.  

Book Vs Television: The Strain S1:E12&13, Last Rites and The Master

 Since BGH was getting an amazing make over last week, I skipped out on the recap of Episode 12, “Last Rites.” It’s not like you missed much, so I’ll sum it up before the recap of the finale.

Book Vs Television: The Strain S1:E7 For Services Rendered

As always the opening of episode seven, “For Services Rendered,” is an immediate attention grabber.

Book Vs Television: The Strain S1:E6 Occultation

Hey FX, aren’t you the same network that just set a cable network record for Emmy nominations? This kind of material is your wheelhouse, so I need you to get it together.

I officially take back everything I ever said about Gabe Bolivar – he was gnarly this week. What a way to open an episode!

I’ll give it to del Toro and Hogan this week. Opening episode four “It’s Not for Everyone” with the dissection of the plane captain was disgusting, fascinating, and an expository change of pace. The show’s “monster” aspects – and their obvious del Toro signatures – keep me coming back each week.

Another week of “The Strain,” another debate with the mister about whether it should have been a movie instead of a TV show. Where the former might have gotten some critical details squeezed out, the latter continues to get away with not-quite-enough exposition each week.

The second episode of FX’s The Strain picks up immediately from where we last left it, opening to Gus the hustler transporting the Master’s coffin across the river.

If you’re a horror or fantasy devotee of any shade, hopefully you’re a student of master filmmaker Guillermo Del Toro. With the help of Chuck Hogan, he recently expanded his storytelling into the written word, delivering the terrifying Strain trilogy.