revenge

Oldboy (REVIEW)

Of all the horror films to be remade in recent years “Oldboy” is probably the one I would think American studios wouldn't want to touch with a ten-foot pole. It’s an incredibly dark, violent, mean-spirited, and shocking film whose finale involves a taboo that American audiences would find revolting. Even though mainstream studios, for whatever reason, are completely stuck in the remake trend, this was an idea that felt so bad I felt compelled to watch just out of sheer morbid curiosity.

Orphan Killer (REVIEW)

Orphan Killer

There are a lot of low-budget horror movies that are light on plot and character development, but few take it to such extremes as 2011’s “Orphan Killer.” This movie doesn’t let silly little things like story get in its way. There’s just a masked killer, some dark corridors, and a hot chick on the run. More than anything, it’s a throwback to early eighties slasher movies with a little “Saw” thrown in for good measure.

Red Hill (REVIEW)

Shane Cooper and his young wife have moved to a small outpost in rural Australia in hopes that the peaceful surroundings will help with a high-risk pregnancy. For the new constable, there seem to be few places more peaceful than Red Hill -- a dwindling town of proud, old-school ranchers. The town's sheriff -- or inspector, rather, as this is Australia -- Old Bill, runs a tight ship, positioning himself more like a stern father than an autocratic dictator. Under normal circumstances, Old Bill likely could have granted Shane Cooper's wish for peace and tranquility.

Hanger (REVIEW)

In a genre whose fans pride themselves on being able to stomach whatever is thrown their way, horror directors continue to push buttons in an attempt to leave a lasting impression. Many amateur filmmakers often choose to keep their finger on the shock button rather than craft an experience that truly sticks. Despite offering up the semi-memorable "Gutterballs" in 2008, director Ryan Nicholson falls headlong into the abyss of forced depravity with 2009's "Hanger."

The Horseman (REVIEW)

A warrior who follows his singular task to its end, forsaking future and fulfilling his pledge with absolute abandon. Absent any context this might well be a hero’s credo; one that most people would deem admirable and worthy of commendation. Christian Forteski, the central character in “The Horseman” has many of the qualities that are reserved for a larger than life archetypal hero. He possesses a strong sense of purpose, unwavering loyalty and a devotion to his goal that makes failure seem a most unlikely outcome.

Dead Man's Shoes (REVIEW)

Paddy Considine is one of the better actors that you’ve not heard enough about. “The Bourne Ultimatum”, “Cinderella Man”, “Hot Fuzz” and the fantastic “In America” are all places where you can sample his work. He has a presence that commands the screen without blotting out the other characters, the story, or the situation. Considine disappears into characters without losing his own unique persona and charisma; because of this he subsequently becomes a victim of his own double-edged talent. Even after some big films his name still rings few bells outside of the UK.

The Last House on the Left (REVIEW)

It was the summer of 1971 when two future horror legends, Wes Craven and Sean Cunningham, gathered in the woods to shoot "Last House on the Left". Almost more important than understanding what happens in the film, it's crucial to understand the world that the film was born into. At the time it was made there was a counter culture suffering from the burnout of a failed social movement and increasingly harder drugs, and a mainstream America whose children were being decimated by the seemingly never-ending conflict in Vietnam.

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