monster

There are a number of options open to parents should their child ever be run over by a gang of one-dimensional hooligans on dirt bikes. They could take said child to the hospital and hope, pray something can be done. They could report the incident to the police. Or, they could seek out a local witch and strike a murky bargain that involves her resurrecting a demon called Pumpkinhead to exact their revenge. It’s fairly easy to guess which option Ed Harley (the always entertaining Lance Henriksen) went with in 1988’s dark fantasy Pumpkinhead.

It seems that the first rule of monster movies is to have a visually striking monster. I think we can all harken back to our first viewing of “Jaws” or “Alien” and remember the shivers that it sent down our spine. One being the fear of sharks magnified and the other an original creation that we didn’t know we were afraid of until it was displayed on the big screen. Even when the monster is successful the next step to effectiveness is to not show it often. Fear is what we don’t know, or better yet can’t know, hence keeping the visual queues to a minimum.

Giving birth is the weapon humanity has against the constant attempt of nature to destroy it, the yin to death’s yang.

Since the election of President Obama, a lot of people have seemingly been ready to declare racism dead and announce that we now live in a “post-racial” America. Despite the fact that we now have an African-American President, there’s a pretty alarming rise in public displays of racism in America today. In fact, just this weekend I witnessed two pretty alarming outbursts directed at minorities while out and about. It was disgusting and pretty shocking to witness something like that, yet alone during the Holiday season.