asian horror

Doomsday Book is a South Korean anthology film from directors and co-writers Kim Ji-woon and Yim Pil-sung. Through the course of three, forty-five minute segments we are pulled through the final moments leading to possible apocalyptic events. Literally translated to English the title reads “Report on the Destruction of Mankind”. Though the subject matter may call to mind a host of grimly violent, depressive, and stomach churning cannibalistic fare (see what I did there?) the segments are nicely balanced with a healthy dose of humor and hope.

Laddaland

The cover of “Laddaland” has the cliched picture of a long dark-haired ghost-girl, and even though this is a trope that has worn pretty thin for most people, I’ll admit it’s something I still really enjoy. For instance, last year saw the release of the umpteenth sequel to the Japanese version of the Grudge, “Juon White Ghost/ Black Ghost” and as many of those films as I’ve seen, the movie was still creepy, and I still really enjoyed it.

White Mirror Image

"White: The Melody Of The Curse" is a film that tries to blend K-Pop music and Asian horror. If that last sentence didn’t turn you off from the seeing White, I’m sorry to also have to tell you that it’s not a very good movie. It tries to take a serious look at the business of pop music while at the same time telling a convoluted story about a cursed song. In the end, unfortunately, it just comes out as a confused mess.

Yoshihiro Nishimura and Naoyuki Tomomatsu's deliriously bizarre 2009 action epic "Vampire Girl vs. Frankenstein Girl" can't arrive on DVD soon enough. The film, which chronicles the battle between two very unusual girls who fall in love with the same boy, promises a vast array of over-the-top arterial sprays and an abundance of gore-soaked mayhem. If you're still perplexed as to why, exactly, I'm anxiously awaiting its release, check out Nishimura's "Tokyo Gore Police." All your questions shall be answered within.