Dead Weight

While covering the Milwaukee Film Festival I had the opportunity to sit down with the co-directors & co-writers of Dead Weight, Adam Barlett and John Pata, as well as the film's composer Nicholas Elert. What follows is the second half of my interview with the filmmakers as we discuss the music of Dead Weight and the state of Indie-horror filmmaking.

While covering the Milwaukee Film Festival I had the opportunity to sit down with the co-directors & co-writers of "Dead Weight", Adam Barlett and John Pata, as well as the film's composer Nicholas Elert. What follows is the first half of my interview with the filmmakers as they discuss the trials of micro-budget, indie-horror filmmaking and the power of collaboration.

What did I learn over the course of the Milwaukee Film Festival’s Cinema Hooligante Program? Five things specifically:

1: I love living in a city that gives a shit about fucked up, unlovable, and/or unsung movies.
2: The creepiness of spiders is inversely proportionate to their size.
3: Those whacky Danes make me blush.
4: Inbred mutant plots are still (thankfully) going strong in quality movies.
5: Claymation is probably the only thing that can still bring me close to reintroducing my beer to the world. (Other than peeing. But then it’s urine and not beer. Right? Right.)

The Milwaukee Film Festival is celebrating its 3rd year with a new extended run beginning Thursday, September 27th and concluding on Thursday, October 11th. The festival will screen over 200 films from all over the globe in venues including the legendary Oriental Theatre, the Downer Theatre, and the Fox-Bay Cinema Grill. Panels, a keynote address by film critic J. Hoberman, live music performances, and post screening conversations are but a taste of what the fest has to offer.

A group of haggard looking nomads shuffle across a half frozen field as grey snow spits out of the overcast sky. Makeshift winter clothes barely conceal the frigid exterior as their breath steams from their panting mouths. Their packs sag with wear and tear rather than from the dearth of survival gear. Each step proves more laborious than the next as they trek across what was once a vibrant, safe country. In the distance they spy an isolated, seemingly abandoned farmhouse and barn. Should they approach? Maybe there is food? Weapons? Supplies? Or worse?