john waters

“Excision” is a movie that defies categorization. It’s being marketed as a horror film, which, while that label is not entirely accurate, is understandable because the film contains a level of squishy gore and bodily fluids that isn’t typically seen outside of genre affairs. Some might argue that it’s more of a comedy. While it is true that mainstream comedies of the last few years have been incrementally edging up against the line between funny and disgusting, “Excision” gleefully charges past that line and dares the audience to laugh or blow chunks.

Jon recounts tails of kicking Hurricane Sandy's ass and we see if "Excision" lives up to the hype.

I recently came across an article published by Jason Zinoman of the NY Times discussing what makes horror fans and horror directors tick. With the increasing number of horror films that have been packed into the theater this summer, especially this month, its clear that horror movies have been in the mainstream eye a bit more so than usual. However, to many of us seasoned horror fans, we've seen so many throat slashing, stabbing and torture scenes that it takes a lot to truly scare us. With all that horror directors have seen and done with their own films, they are no different.

Beverly Sutphin is just your typical suburban housewife. She's a loving wife and mother, a PTA member, and oh yes, a rage filled killer. Mrs. Sutphin is very protective of her family and if you don't live up to her standards of perfection then... well I'm sorry, but you're dead. Whether she's making obscene phone calls to the neighbors or murdering her daughter's cheating boyfriend, Kathleen Turner is downright hilarious in this cult favorite.

You can’t call yourself a true horror fan if you’ve never been to a midnight movie. There are few things that can draw you into a film more than a rowdy audience of inebriated, enthusiastic genre fans all gathered around to take part in the same film. In “Midnight Movies”, Film scholar Stuart Samuels traces the origin of the midnight movie and it’s subsequent embrace by the mainstream audience by documenting key films in cult cinema.