folk metal

A few weeks ago, I noted that I found it interesting how extreme metal and folk music had found themselves intertwined.

What makes folk metal interesting is how it is the unlikely union of two things that should not go together. Metal is hard, brash, and abrasive, while folk music is soft, acoustic, and introspective.

Let’s cut to the chase. Turisas’ “Turisas2013” is a clear contender for Album Of The Year honors. There’s no two ways about it. Yes, it has a sub-standard title, but let’s not be shallow enough to let that get in the way.

My wife is a very patient woman, who only takes a less-than-casual interest in heavy metal because it makes it easier for us to spend time together. The following conversation happened in our living room:

In the quickly multiplying and increasingly competitive world of folk metal, bands are given an early choice between two camps, each representing one of the possible idiomatic sounds of the genre.

Johnny, rosin up your bow and play that fiddle hard! There’s a new Eluveitie album, which means it’s time to grab your fife and fiddle and head out in the Swiss/Celtic countryside and play your heart out!

If “Stand Up and Fight” can’t make you smile at least a little, you’re taking yourself way too seriously.