album reviews

Heavy metal and comedy can be a caustic combination. The frequently acerbic nature of either medium can, if not properly mixed and settled, create an overly acidic and tartly sardonic solution that is unfit for consumption.

You got alternative rock in my metal! You got metal in my alternative rock! Thus was born “The Damned Things,” a supergroup formed of pieces from Anthrax, Every Time I Die, and Fall Out Boy.

As They Sleep couldn’t be more different from their namesake. Anything but a languid trip through tranquil dreams, the band’s new album “Dynasty” is a nightmare landscape of all-out sonic assault.

Metal forefather and steadfast veteran Tom Warrior—pardon me—Thomas G. Warrior has embarked on this new journey called Triptykon, shedding the mortal coil or Celtic Frost and venturing into new territory.

“Darkly, Darkly Venus Aversa,” while ever so slightly different from the other Cradle of Filth albums, is just as eclectic and ranging as ever.

What is this? What am I hearing? I understand that it's a collection of chords and notes and drums and vocals, but those are just its requisite parts. My question, on a much more fundamental level, is what IS this?

Let me start with a compliment to Alter Bridge. Although they will likely always share an inseparable bond with Creed, they have managed with this new effort to emerge from that other band’s shadow.

Talk about a band that's been through the wringer. Despite lineup changes, multiple periods off, a rumored fight over the production of 2001's "God Says No," and just on November 3rd, the departure of longtime guitarist Ed Mundell, Monster Magnet rolls on.

For what probably amounts to a couple of decades all said and done, Zakk Wylde was a hero of heavy metal, the everyman kid lucky enough to find his way onto the world’s largest metal stages.

Normally, greatest hits albums, whether they're masked as "career retrospectives" or some other convoluted term, go unnoticed by me.