doom metal

Doom metal has always been an underground scene, but even in doom there are levels of complete anonymity.

Brooklyn, New York, for a long time, was one of the foremost scenes in all of heavy metal. Generally characterized in alternating turns by sludge, sleaze, doom and camaraderie, the city gave rise to some of the most influential metal acts of the '80s and '90s. Chief among them were Type O Negative and Life of Agony, both acts featuring New York veteran Sal Abruscato. Sal has returned with a band all his own, releasing a second album with A Pale Hose Named Death, and hopes to keep the spirit of Brooklyn metal alive. Here to discuss his album, his band, his history and pizza, is Sal Abruscato.

In 2009, vocalist and guitarist Toby Wright formed Age of Taurus as a one-man studio project. After self-releasing the demo “In the Days of the Taurean Empire” in 2010, Wright’s project quickly grew in popularity and received numerous stellar reviews.

We’ve been talking a lot lately about the revival in traditional metal and the rise of bands that embody the blues-doom spirit.

The past five years have seen the gears of the machine behind Blood Ceremony turning with increasing velocity. Born in 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the band released a self-titled record in 2008 that was re-released in a deft move by Metal Blade Records in 2011. Credited as being one of the most original bands in all of Toronto, Blood Ceremony returns this year with their third effort, the excellent and innovative "The Eldritch Dark." Here to explain the album, how it came to be and how the band started is bassist Lucas Gadke. Oh, and he drops some wicked classic horror titles, too.

When last we heard from My Dying Bride, just last year, they were continuing to build their legacy with the very good “ A Map Of All Our Failures”. That record was all things My Dying Bride; heavy, doomy, progressive, and singularly theirs.

There are concerns for bands that extend beyond the writing and playing of their music. Making an album can be a long, tedious, draining experience, but the job isn't done when the last note is given the final once over.

When entering blindly into an album, the descriptions we use to categorize the music we hear aren't always good enough.

It seems almost impossible to think about The Sword’s “Apocryphon” without also thinking of their mammoth concept album “Warp Riders.” That record was nothing short of a modern masterpiece, masterfully blending blues-soaked doom riffs with the fiery grit of heavy metal, the end result a symphony

There's always a drip of anticipation when putting on a record from a legendary band, even when you have no personal history with them. My Dying Bride had never entered my radar, so even though I knew of their legacy in establishing doom as we know it, my take on the album is with fresh ears.