punk

Finally, we have reached the age where there are two distinct schools of punk in the traditional sense.  For those of us past a certain age, we think of punk solely in the most classic sense – the Ramones, the Clash, MC5, the Damned, on and on.

 

Many years ago, I was in New York City for a convention and found myself walking through midtown during some down time.  It was raining moderately, and as I walked I came upon a smallish gentleman standing at the intersection.  He had a slouched demeanor, but one that suggested he wasn’

Answering a question no one asked can be a dangerous enterprise, because the greatest uncertainty involved is in assuming someone cares about the answer.

Both as a journalist, and as someone with an interest in heavy guitar music, it's difficult for me to admit the staggering gaps in my knowledge.

This recent run of popularity for Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein comes a little out of nowhere. Doyle’s place in music history is certainly assured, having been a fixture for the Misfits.

Somewhere between 1997 and 2006, we saw the marketplace dominance of pop punk. It was everywhere; at several spots on the radio dial and ever-present in the hallways of colleges and high schools.

Finnish upstart Snow White’s Poison Bite is being billed as in the same vein as Black Veil Brides, but there’s more going on than that.

In 1990, The Casualties formed to resurrect the sound of true street punk, a sound that they thought was abandoned in the mid eighties.

An awful lot of noise. That’s the first gut reaction to “Bloodstreams,” the new full-length album from Australian do-it-all duo DZ Deathrays. For just two people, this is a full-bore effort, ripped from the core of punk’s heart and rock and roll’s soul.