WTF?!

As my life begins its inevitable journey through the rugged terrain of middle age, I've discovered that my genre-related cravings are leaning heavily towards the silly, the outlandish, and the unapologetically over-the-top. In general, horror movies aren't very frightening to me anymore, forcing yours truly to turn his attention towards films that are saturated in gore, shock, and, more importantly, outlandish physical comedy. If someone gets struck repeatedly about the head and neck while entrails and assorted body parts explode across the screen, then I'm usually a pretty happy camper.

Sweeney Todd would be so proud. Alright, Thailand’s Kittiwat Unarrom isn’t actually putting people in his bread but he could've fooled me based on these pictures. He’s opened up his very own “Body Bakery” and what he’s filled it with is bread in the shape of decapitated heads, dismembered arms and all kind of other fun crap. That isn’t gross enough for you? Well he presents his creations in his very own showroom that is set up to look like a grocery store. Complete with saran wrapped heads and body parts on meat hooks. Yummy!

David Lynch and Moby are good friends. They share an interest in transcendental meditation, weird sounds, and isolated factories. So, when Moby needed a music video he asked Lynch, who took a literal approach to the single “Shot in the Back of the Head” from Moby's new album “Wait for Me.”

There isn’t much to say about this one beyond the creator's description. All I can say is thank God for the internet and its ability to keep me away from doing actual work.

What if Ghostbusters, the movie, was shot in 1954 instead of 1984? Who should be part of the cast? Would they have the same equipment? Who would they battle? Considering Dan Aykroyd's concept owes a lot to Bob Hope, Abbott and Costello, and Lewis and Martin comedies of the 40s and 50s, it is not that big of a stretch to speculate.

In case you were wondering -- and I'm almost positive most of you weren't -- I watch a lot of cheesy motion pictures produced during the 80's and 90's. And as sad as it may sound, I actually pride myself on the embarrassing number of films I've managed to stuff into my desensitized, oversaturated little mind. Diving into a creamy cinematic vat of genre-related obscurity is one of my favorite pastimes, rivaled only by my addiction to poorly-dubbed, low-budget kung fu movies, the sort that usually come packaged by the metric ton.

Being a fan of both "The Thing" and "The Blob" -- the originals and remakes -- it's safe to say that I have a taste for cheesy science fiction-horror hybrids featuring either large flesh-eating blobs or body-possessing alien lifeforms. Perhaps that's why the trailer for John Lechago's upcoming gorefest "Bio Slime" appeals to me in ways I'm really not comfortable discussing in a public forum such as this. Nevermind the apparent low budget or the shot-on-digital look of the film -- all I'm after is goo, body melting, and campy performances.

I’m all for technological advances. The sooner I can get a Rosie the robot to clean my house the better. But the Pentagon has gone too far this time. They’ve commissioned a Maryland based technology group to create a steam powered robot that can fuel itself by eating up different organic material. Grass, wood, oil and even human bodies are all on the menu. That’s right folks, corpse eating robots.

Jason Eisener’s “Treevenge” has been getting some serious attention since it showed up on the scene back in 08. Along the way it’s picked up awards at the New York City Horror Film Fest, Toronto After Dark Festival, San Francisco Independent Film Festival and a bunch of other well known festivals. Well now “Treevenge” is available online for all to enjoy. This 16 minute film shows what happens when your Christmas trees get fed up and decides to fight back. It’s Christmas in July people!