spanish horror

Mama (REVIEW)

Mama marks the feature film debut of director Andrés Muschietti. Inspired by his short film of the same title , Mama revels in archaic horror tropes; favoring the terrors of primordial nature, feral humanity, madness, ghosts moaning in the night, and the return of the repressed. The film is drenched in fiercely aggressive shadows, tightly framed locations, and more than a handful of scenes involving scuttling figures climbing across floors and walls.

REC3: Genesis (REVIEW)

Rec 3

Directed and written by Paco Plaza with co-writer Luiso Berdejo, “[REC] 3: Genesis” is an occasional zombie funhouse that concerns itself with reclaiming the “Fun” of zombie flicks. While the first two films in the “[REC]” series forewent absurdity in favor of their hyper-realistic intensity, “[REC]3” works to incorporate more overtly irreverent material.

Balada triste de trompeta (The Last Circus) (REVIEW)

Álex de la Iglesia’s “Balada triste de trompeta” (Sad Trumpet Ballad) is a manic blend of old school horror images, some twisted humor, grotesque, audacious violence, a sprinkling of sex, and a deep interest in reconciling Spain’s national past with the countries contemporary orientation. More commonly known in the states as “The Last Circus”, the film is an exemplary rendition of a how a film can set out to be purposefully “cult” in its execution and still stay true to those roots.

Posters: "[REC]3: Genesis"

I never saw "[REC]2" so I have no idea where this series has gone. Is there going to be a wedding? Do I have to bring a present? Because I don't really have time to pick one up. Is cash ok? Anyway, ya, they're still making these. This one hits Spanish theaters at the end of March.

The Skin I Live In (La Piel Que Habito) (REVIEW)

It was only a matter of time before Pedro Almodóvar made a horror film. His decades long career directing, writing, and producing exhibits a constant concern for themes that flirt with the horror film genre. His films revel in all things melodramatic, the fluidity and ambiguity of sexual and gender identity, a love for surfaces and pop culture, camp, and the perils of isolation. A few of his films, namely “Carne Trémula” and “Atame!”, more precisely lean toward the horrific.

The Others (REVIEW)

The Others” is a film I have heard mentioned in several discussions on the shape of narrative cinema over the passed decade. And while I did see the film upon its initial release I never much had the urge to revisit it. I remember enjoying the experience but not quite recalling anything particularly extraordinary about it. However, revisiting the film 10 years after its release it is easy to see the potential and foresight displayed here.

Subtitled Trailer For "[Rec] 2"

Out of principal I generally will say the American version of any film is better no matter who made it first. Anyone who doesn’t hate freedom and bald eagles would have to agree. It’s a fact. But after watching “Quarantine”, the American version of the Spanish film “[Rec]”, I had to say I was impressed. Namely it didn’t have Jennifer Carpenter sniffling in a camera for 90 minutes. Queue the fat guy screaming GOAL!

Blame (REVIEW)

In general, I do not like babies. I like the cute ones, of course, the ones with about as much mobility as a kitten, sure, but above that, I have a general disdain for the newly arrived, which probably makes me the desired audience for “Blame.” Like the recent “Grace,” “Blame” also deals with women's issues. While admittedly “Grace” is more creative in its approach, “Blame” barrels down the 'abortion, love it or hate it' route, with a bland fury.

The Christmas Tale (REVIEW)

Unconventional Christmas films have always been a favorite of mine, whether it's a film about a murderous snowman or an unhappy gingerbread man, I'm usually on board for spicing up the dullness of Santa and snow. While “The Christmas Tale” does feature a Santa, it takes place in a warm palm tree laden town in Spain. But the focus here is not on Christmas, it's on how to approach someone who has put themselves on the naughty list.

To Let (REVIEW)

There is nothing I find more terrifying than looking for a place to live. Real estate agents, potential frat guy neighbors, finding a place where I can reside in peace; the entire process is altogether unappealing and “To Let” knows it. The 4th film I have viewed from the Spanish collection “6 Films to Keep you Awake,” “To Let” is an exercise in residential terror.

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