nostalgia

I admit it, I'm a lifelong "Star Trek" hater. Over the years I've tried to get into "Star Trek" a few times but I don't think I've ever made it all the way through an episode. Not that I minded that much - every geek needs another group of geeks they can look at and feel cool in comparison. If I became a Trekkie there'd be no one left for my scorn but the LARPers.

Summer is upon us my friends and that means I’ll be searching for shelter from the abusive sun and all it’s skin burning powers. Luckily for everyone in the NYC area, which includes me, The Coney Island Film Society will be showing a different horror movie every Saturday night as part of their “Summer Of Horror”.

For those who may be new to the site, we tend to take a bit less stringent approach to content when it comes to our blogs. Really, anything pop culture related is up for grabs, although we obviously tend to make sure the focus is normally on horror.

At first glance, director Jack Messitt's snappy 2008 feature-length debut "Midnight Movie" may seem like yet another tired retread populated with a handful of pretty actors who are probably too young to genuinely appreciate the movies that inspired this surprisingly sharp, blood-drenched excursion into the well-worn slasher subgenre. And, for the most part, your knee-jerk reaction to the film is fairly accurate. However, because Messitt and everyone involved appear to be having such a blast with the material, chances are you'll forgive the picture its trespasses, of which there are a few.

We take a run at John Carpenter's "They Live", a fun, campy 80's horror flick with strong human and political themes.

Sometime around 1977, I became aware of a late night phenomenon here in The San Francisco Bay Area. Through a series of overnights stays at the homes of friends with much more lenient parents than my own, I discovered a program called "Creature Features". Its host was a quiet, four-eyed, stogy-smoking oddball named Bob Wilkins.