heavy metal

Born and bred from the untamed, wild regions of New York, metal up-and-comer Selfish Needy Creatures don't really care if you want to kiss them or kill them. Just so long as you listen. They'll be out again on the road in a few short weeks, but before that tour is scheduled to start, singer/lunatic Vegas Nacy took some time to talk horror movies with me. Take it away, Vegas!

Metal forefather and steadfast veteran Tom Warrior—pardon me—Thomas G. Warrior has embarked on this new journey called Triptykon, shedding the mortal coil or Celtic Frost and venturing into new territory. At his side is a cadre of talented metal veterans, and together they released “Eparistera Daimones,” a compendium of pulsating, thundering metal.

Check out "The Vinyl Conflict"'s Kerry King dissecting the one-of-a-kind Slayer LP box set.

Kerry doesn't say much that's earth-shattering here, but there are a lot of interesting little parts as he talks about each album from the box set. For those not in the know, Slayer is releasing "The Vinyl Conflict," a box set of all ten of their Def/American recordings, all pressed to 180 gram vinyl. It's pre-selling on Slayer's website for about $150.

“Darkly, Darkly Venus Aversa,” while ever so slightly different from the other Cradle of Filth albums, is just as eclectic and ranging as ever. Now, let me be clear; the album is all metal through and through, and puts definition to the term “extreme metal.” It’s the mixing of sounds and ominous themes with blast beats and high-handed guitar that gives the album a sense of being just plain different. It’s appropriate that an album telling the story of the fabled character Lilith should range from placid grace to frenetic vehemence.

What is this? What am I hearing? I understand that it's a collection of chords and notes and drums and vocals, but those are just its requisite parts. My question, on a much more fundamental level, is what IS this? What is it that All That Remains hoped to project with this new effort "For We Are Many"?

Let me start with a compliment to Alter Bridge. Although they will likely always share an inseparable bond with Creed, they have managed with this new effort to emerge from that other band’s shadow. Some of that comes from the lack of allegedly righteous pretension that has bloated Creed’s legacy, but much of it comes from a musical edge that Creed continues to lack.

Talk about a band that's been through the wringer. Despite lineup changes, multiple periods off, a rumored fight over the production of 2001's "God Says No," and just on November 3rd, the departure of longtime guitarist Ed Mundell, Monster Magnet rolls on.

We've all been to concerts, seen the splendor of our favorite bands, and walked home happy. Behind those pressed, clean and/or theatrical experiences, there lives an entire society of road crews, bus drivers, long hours, bad food, managers, technicians and venue staff who make all that possible. Pedro Rodriguez just got off the road, and is heading back out in November for another grueling experience. In the meantime, I got to share some words with him about touring, Dimebag Darrell, horror movies and venues across our great country.

For what probably amounts to a couple of decades all said and done, Zakk Wylde was a hero of heavy metal, the everyman kid lucky enough to find his way onto the world’s largest metal stages. His was a modern story reminding us all to not forget our musical dreams; that the big break could be just around the corner.

Now, the genre judges Zakk much differently. Following some self-important antics, two uninspired, pedestrian Black Label albums and a split from longtime paycheck Ozzy Osbourne, we now see Wylde back at the drawing board with “Order of the Black.”