Geddy’s Moon is John Mulhall’s debut novel, which he began working on over twenty years ago as a teenager. This tidbit of knowledge is extremely important, as all his efforts and years poured into this project definitely paid off tenfold.

Red Rain is RL Stine’s baby step from children’s bedtime terrors to adult horror. Based around Lea Sutter, a fledging travel writer, who decides against severe weather warnings to visit the mysterious island of Cape Le Chat Noir, off the coast of South Carolina.

JG Ballard spares no detail of the human fascination with sex, violence, and death in his novel Crash. Navigating the crowded technological highway of civilization, Ballard graphically implores the emphasis of technology and it’s replacing of human interaction.

CW LaSart’s horror collection is very accurately named, Ad Nauseam, as it harbors thirteen tales of intensely stomach churning horror.

Solid anthologies are usually hard to come by. All too often collections are littered with great, enrapturing stories as well as the few you’d really rather skip through.

Dan Dillard's How To Eat a Human Being, is a collection of both poetry and short stories. Per usual with his writings, Dillard leads wild ride through the darker side of human nature and introduces seven unforgettable characters and their demons.

The pains of adolescence are well known by everyone. The struggle to find one’s self and be accepted by their peers is usually one of the most harrowing events in growing up.

Left on the roadside by their wayward and absconding mother, Delphine Dodd realizes this time is not like the others.

The 1980’s were a time of decadence and opportunity; two things with which Bill Turk is quite acquainted. On the lam from his ex-con past, he seizes a lucrative position within the oil industry and is determined to make as much money as possible.

Dan Dillard’s short story Pig Man is the prime example of that tin platitude, a little bit goes a long way. Clocking in at only eleven pages, Pig Man, successfully delivers the chilling creeps that loiter well past the fifteen or so minutes it takes to read it the story.