M. Drew's blog

Album Review: Lonewolf - "The Fourth and Final Horseman"

We typically use this space to discuss the comings, goings and debuts of heavy metal, but let’s step back a second and ask a metaphysical question: What makes great music? We can all voice our opinions about why we love music to our very cores, and in a debate rarity, we’re all correct. The point is, no matter what our personal reasons are, they are all permutations of the same umbrella concept; like any non-visual medium, we appreciate that music gives us a mental image, or inspiration or a journey. Simply stated, no matter our stripes, music takes us someplace.

Album Review: Sirenia - "Perils of the Deep Blue"

European metal is a crowded landscape. In a genre choked with also-rans and soundalikes, every band tries to boast their worthiness as a product of their values, their image or their virtuoso guitar talent. Sirenia, the gothic band from Norway, attempts to stand out by placing all their chips singularly on vocal prowess and a sense of the moment. It’s risky roulette to play when the fans expect certain tropes to be part and parcel, but through this lens we are introduced to “Perils of the Deep Blue.”

Album Review: Havok - "Unnatural Selection"

In recent years, we’ve witness a real revival of thrash as we once knew it. Bullet belts, gallop riff and west coast snarling are back in fashion. The more shows I go to, the more I’m seeing the return of denim, patch covered jackets and other paraphernalia ‘rescued’ from the early ‘80s that was such a part of thrash’s iconic birth. The pages of this very site have become littered with the exploits of a thrash resurgence, the genre reborn through a new generation and new eyes.

Album Review: Orphaned Land - "All Is One"

Orphaned Land is a band totally consumed by their message. Normally in metal, that message has a good chance of being insipid or sophomoric. We’ve seen messages that range from “CHAOS!” to “Drink until you can’t feel feelings anymore” and let’s not forget the tried and true “all organized societal institutions are crap.” As fans, it falls on us to either embrace or, more commonly, overlook any petulance and merely attempt to absorb and judge the music.

Album Review: Black Sabbath - "13"

Deep breath.

This is one of things that you never think you’ll see in your life. Usually the next statement after that is some kind of unbridled joy, but the release of Black Sabbath’s “13” leaves feelings of wary confusion. Questions remain abound – What is this? Why are we here? Was this trip really necessary? This isn’t a cash grab (at least it better not be,) so why does it even exist?

Album Review: Amon Amarth - "Deceiver of the Gods"

Over the past four or so years, no band has risen from underground to head-of-the-class faster than Amon Amarth. Their last album “Surtur Rising” was a breakout party onto the main stage despite being their eighth record, which is testament to the band’s patience and dedication.

Album Review: The Black Dahlia Murder - "Everblack"

One of the first rules of journalism is that the story should never be about you. Attention should always be focused on the subject or action of the piece, with the reporter acting only as narrator. We here at Bloody Good Horror pride ourselves on trying to keep to that rule, only allowing our personal experiences to color articles as a product of our editorial insight (or lack thereof, as I’m sure my readers have at least occasionally believed.)

Album Review: Evile - "Skull"

Despite all its loudly orated trappings to the contrary, metal is very much a genre that embraces the ideas of tradition and legacy. This really isn’t that surprising; all counter cultures recognize their own, and scrutinize members’ inclusion based on a selection of worthy criteria. In this sense, counter-cultures and underground movements aren’t at all different from the mainstream institutions they rail against, which is a sort of cruel, unyielding irony.

EP Review: No Inside - "Live. Regret. Learn"

Somewhere between 1997 and 2006, we saw the marketplace dominance of pop punk. It was everywhere; at several spots on the radio dial and ever-present in the hallways of colleges and high schools. Punk’s old guard railed and bellowed, but the youth had spoken – pop punk would be the music of the day. Its cascade of popularity even gave itself into willing parody, culminating in the birth of the Aquabats and a handful of others.

Album Review: Church of Misery - "Thy Kingdom Scum"

We’ve been talking a lot lately about the revival in traditional metal and the rise of bands that embody the blues-doom spirit. Consequently, we’ve had the conversation about whether it’s fair to constantly make Black Sabbath the default analog for all these bands, or whether that’s simply the lazy way out. In the case of Church of Misery, we see a traditional doom band from Japan who has made it their sole career aspiration to be compared to Sabbath, openly idolizing the Birmingham legends and simultaneously declaring themselves “unworthy” of their metal gods.

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This week we discuss alchemy, camera technology, a first time guest host joins the show, and we review "As Above, So Below".  

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