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Book Review: The Red Church by Scott Nicholson

Scott Nicholson’s The Red Church builds its foundation on southern ghost stories. Shadowed by the ancient Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, a church was constructed in the late 19th century. Unfortunately for the Reverend Wendell McFall, whose fanatical ravings of God’s Second Son required the sacrifice of a child, the red church required his own sacrifice as well. Hung out on tree framing the front door of the church, Reverend Wendell McFall became a Halloween legend. A ghost story passed from generation to generation as the red church stands as foreboding as ever.

Book Review: Stephen King's Joyland

Revisiting his old ways, Stephen King’s newest novel, Joyland has the heart of that disenchanted college youth you once were and the fun you were bound to have in spite of your looming shortcomings.Joyland is a quick read that ticks you slowly up the top of that rickety rollercoaster just to plummet you headfirst into unseen curves and humps. A nostalgic ride through a lost summer, a first love, a mysterious new place and the sweat of a summer job, King haunts you with things you’ve tried to forget and then those things you yearn to remember.

Book Review: Geddy's Moon by John Mulhall

Geddy’s Moon is John Mulhall’s debut novel, which he began working on over twenty years ago as a teenager. This tidbit of knowledge is extremely important, as all his efforts and years poured into this project definitely paid off tenfold.

Book Review: Red Rain by RL Stine

Red Rain is RL Stine’s baby step from children’s bedtime terrors to adult horror. Based around Lea Sutter, a fledging travel writer, who decides against severe weather warnings to visit the mysterious island of Cape Le Chat Noir, off the coast of South Carolina. After witnessing a long practiced and popular reincarnation ritual, Lea is stranded at a local’s house while a terrible hurricane devastates the entire island. In the aftermath of the storm, Lea spots two beautiful, orphaned twin boys.

Book Review: Crash by JG Ballard

JG Ballard spares no detail of the human fascination with sex, violence, and death in his novel Crash. Navigating the crowded technological highway of civilization, Ballard graphically implores the emphasis of technology and it’s replacing of human interaction. Desperate for emotional and physical connections, Ballard’s characters neurotically obsess over the pain and scars that car collisions leave on their flesh, as well as the sexual symmetry of the event itself.

Book Review: Ad Nauseam by C.W. LaSart

CW LaSart’s horror collection is very accurately named, Ad Nauseam, as it harbors thirteen tales of intensely stomach churning horror. LaSart is a pro at spinning a driving story with characters who often live on the fringe of society’s idea of convention and do not warrant much pity for their decisions in the direction of their lives. However unconventional LaSart’s characters may be, the terror that awaits them in her stories are nothing less than gut wrenching.

Book Review: These Lonely Places by RK Kombrinck

Solid anthologies are usually hard to come by. All too often collections are littered with great, enrapturing stories as well as the few you’d really rather skip through. However, this is definitely not the case with RK Kombrinck’s These Lonely Places, which is a complete ensemble of unnerving stories that dredge up the unconscious fear in everyday life.

Book Review: Uzumaki/Spiral into Horror by Junji Ito (Manga)

Award winning manga artist and writer, Junji Ito produces another notable work of terror with his Uzumaki Vol. 1. Influenced by other Japanese artists such as Yasutaka Tsutsui (a novelist and science fiction author), Hideshi Hino (a manga artist), Kazuo Umezu (from whom Ito actually won his first mention from for a short story), as well as American writer H.P. Lovecraft, Ito mingles his admiration to create several spinning tales of crazed trepidation. Even readers who are not familiar with manga - or have only little/Americanized knowledge of such graphic novels (ie.

Book Review: How To Eat A Human Being by Dan Dillard

Dan Dillard's How To Eat a Human Being, is a collection of both poetry and short stories. Per usual with his writings, Dillard leads wild ride through the darker side of human nature and introduces seven unforgettable characters and their demons.

Book Review: The Gold Spot by JG Faherty

The pains of adolescence are well known by everyone. The struggle to find one’s self and be accepted by their peers is usually one of the most harrowing events in growing up. JG Faherty’s, The Cold Spot, illustrates the vulnerability of youth and the manipulation of death with unnerving detail and motivation.

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