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Book Vs Television: The Strain S1:E2 The Box

The second episode of FX’s The Strain picks up immediately from where we last left it, opening to Gus the hustler transporting the Master’s coffin across the river. Though the episode begins delving deeper into the “virus” itself – and, more enlighteningly, its potential commercial and political implications on one of the world’s largest cities – the plot plods at a pace nearly rivaling Gus Van Sant’s Last Days. Whereas the book’s monolithic, apolocalyptic atmosphere loomed high, the show has thus far largely missed the mark.

Book Vs Television: The Strain S1:E1 Night Zero

If you’re a horror or fantasy devotee of any shade, hopefully you’re a student of master filmmaker Guillermo Del Toro. With the help of Chuck Hogan, he recently expanded his storytelling into the written word, delivering the terrifying Strain trilogy. Now, FX has brought the story to life as del Toro originally intended: a television show. The story vividly captures an apocalyptic nightmare initially disguised as a post-9/11 paranoid disaster.

Book Review: The Night Girl by Amy Cross

Amy Cross’ The Night Girl,follows Juliet in her pre-college blues as she reluctantly takes a job at the Crestview retirement home. Instinctually bored, Juliet seeks out the nooks and crannies of the rundown facility and finds someone that has been waiting for her for quite sometime. When Juliet meets Jennifer Mathis, she doesn’t believe she’s a ghost, she doesn’t even believe that she’s real. After a few treacherous graveyard shifts, Juliet realizes that regardless of what Jennifer is, she has several skills that are very handy for Juliet.

Book News: Upcoming Horror Books to Screen

A Good Marriage:

Based on the Stephen King short story from “Full Dark No Stars,” a woman begins to question her husband’s constant work travel and unravels a sinister secret he’s been hiding from his family at home. The cast includes Joan Allen, Anthony LaPaglia, and Krisien Connelly (Cabin in the Woods, House of Cards.)
One of my favorites in the collection and hopefully delivers as well on screen as it did on paper.



Under the Skin:

Book Review: Tamara Thorne's The Sorority

I feel need to preface this with the fact that I found Tamara Thorne’s book and took a chance because it mentioned witches and I've been on an AHS: Coven kick...Unfortunately, my senses were way off and that proved to be a terrible chance. I don’t really like cheerleaders or sororities unless they are followed by massacres and this book has none of those.

Upcoming 2014 Book Releases

Since I was late on the Best Books of 2013, and the fact that the majority of the books I read last year weren’t published in ’13 - a short list for some interesting early 2014 releases seemed more appropriate.

Snowblind, Christopher Golden - January, 21

Top 5 Halloween Reads, 2013

Since Halloween is on a Thursday night this year and we're all in that limbo of debating on partying it up on a week night or waiting to enjoy the weekend celebrations...you could always stay home in your costume and read.

5. Goodnight Goon, Michael Rex – 2008
Look, I know we’re pretending to be adults in our normal day-to-day lives, but who doesn’t appreciate a little nostalgia? Goodnight Goon is a monster parody of the well-known children’s book, Goodnight Moon. Yes, it is a picture book – but the illustrations were fun and worth checking out

Book Review: Night Film by Marisha Pessl

Not since way back in 2006 – when I stumbled onto Mark Danielewski’s House of Leaves – have I been so engrossed by the world of a book as I was by Marisha Pessl’s Night Film. Now, I’m not saying it’s as arrestingly visual, intricately woven, or labyrinthine as Leaves, but it’s still an expertly crafted neo noir tale of mystery and death. Had the mighty Alfred Hitchcock tried his hand at the written word, he might’ve given us something akin to Night Film.

Book Review: Waiting Period by Hubert Selby Jr.

What does a man do when he’s reached the point of no return, and the only solution is death’s sweet release? Worse, what happens to that man when the release he expects never comes?
Hubert Selby, Jr. is no stranger to the darker side of human nature. His novel Waiting Period is a disturbing firsthand account of how far someone can be pushed when they feel they’ve hit bottom.

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