Personal Reflections on Dave Brockie of GWAR

By now, everyone has heard the news that Dave Brockie, better known under the alias Oderus Urungus of GWAR, has passed away, too young, at age 50. While the entire metal community feels this loss in a profound way, it seems doubly like a gut punch on the heels of Cory Smoot’s sudden passing in 2011. For years, GWAR has been such a mainstay that their continuance seemed a given. Now for the first time, the future of the band is in doubt.

Album Review: Emerson Hart - Beauty In Disrepair

If you're of a certain age, you know Emerson Hart's voice, even if you can't recall the name. As the lead singer of Tonic, he was front and center on a string of hit rock songs, including the most played single on all of radio in 1997. Anyone who turned on a radio back then knows “If You Could Only See”, and ever since he has continued writing great songs, even if the radio landscape has made it hard for an artist like him to get airplay. The pop world is fickle, and as the trends have changed, there isn't much room left for an honest songwriter.

Album Review: Bigelf - "Into The Maelstrom"

Alright, class. The subject we'll be discussing this week is a genre commonly referred to as "progressive metal". When I hear the word "progressive" I think of acts like Rush and King Crimson. Technically, Fates Warning and Queensryche are also classified as progressive along with one of the most successful progressive metal acts, Dream Theater. Add to that list the album I'm reviewing today, "Into the Maelstrom" by Bigelf.

Grand Piano's Pulpy Love of High & Low

In Eugenio Mira’s “Grand Piano” renowned concert pianist Tom Selznick (Elijah Wood) reemerges from early retirement after he chokes during a concert attempting to play the “Unplayable Piece” by his mentor Patrick Godureaux. Following Patrick’s death, Tom is convinced by his star actress wife Emma (Kerry Bishé) to return to the stage playing Patrick’s piano in his remembrance. Hesitant to bring shame to his mentor, Tom experiences intense anxiety made more pressing by media inquires and some hazing from the orchestra. (They call him Failznick!

All Cheerleaders Die! (REVIEW)

Lucky McKee has long established himself as one of the stalwarts of subversive, indie horror with cult hits like May and The Woman. His films have been feminist examinations of the damaged human psyche, and he's never been afraid to travel down some dark paths in order to tell his stories. What I never would have guessed is McKee, along with co-writer and director Chris Siverston, had a film as breezy and funny as ALL CHEERLEADERS DIE in him that still manages to be as woman positive and subversive as his earlier works.

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